Can the ECB negative interest rate induce banks to lend more to each other? (Etude)

 

FRENCH version follows the ENGLISH version here-below // Version française à la suite de la version anglaise

 

I thank Peter Stella and Jézabel Couppey-Soubeyran for feedback and insightfull discussions. Opinions are my own.

 

Highlights:

- It is recognized by many economists that a negative interest rate is not a tool aiming at "inducing banks to lend more to households or companies" as (put simply) banks do not "lend out" reserves

- In the case of interbank loans however banks do "lend out" reserves

- I thus discuss the argument "a negative interest rate can induce banks to lend more to each other on the interbank market"

- The argument appears mechanically invalid

- Only a larger corridor rate or a partial taxation of reserves system can lead to increasing interbank lending

 

 

Many economists argue that the ECB negative interest rate on banks' excess reserves cannot in itself incentivize banks to lend more to households or companies (see Stella (2014) or Ducrozet (2015) eg). The core argument they advance (among others) is of mechanical nature: banks do not “lend out” reserves when making a loan to a household or a company, thus it is incorrect to assert that banks could be subjected to such loan incentives with a tax on their reserves [1].

In the case of loans to other banks however, banks do “lend out” reserves: when a bank makes a loan to another bank, reserves leave the lending bank's account at the ECB (to go on the borrowing bank's account). Thus, by making a loan to another bank, it is possible for a bank to escape the tax on reserves imposed by a negative interest rate. Does the ECB negative interest rate thus create an incentive for banks to lend more to each others? If it were the case, this would have positive effects on interbank market liquidity and thus potentially positive effects on the economy. Some economists suggest this could be a channel at work.

This post explains that this can't be the case: there is no such a mechanical effect making a negative interest rate on banks' excess reserves result in incentives for banks to lend more to each others (part 1). However, it can be that a negative interest rate results in an increasing velocity of reserves on the interbank market in two particular cases (part 2): (1) if the interest rate on banks' excess reserves only is lowered (larger rate corridor) and (2) if only a part of excess reserves is subjected to the negative interest rate (partial taxation of reserves). In these cases the increasing velocity of reserves wouldn't be the result of the negativity of the rate: the same mechanic would be at work with a positive interest rate. In spite of everything, we conclude that it is unlikely that the ECB resorted to (1) (larger rate corridor) last December or will put (2) into place this month with the goal of increasing interbank market activity (conclusion).

 

1.      An invalid theoretical argument

Suppose that all banks' excess reserves are taxed with a 0,1% interest rate (thus the interest rate on the deposit facility of the ECB would be equal to -0,1%) and that the refi rate of the ECB (the rate at which banks can borrow from the ECB weekly) is at +0,15%. Now suppose the ECB decides to lower its interest rates by 10 basis points: the excess reserves are now taxed at 0,2% and the refi rate now equals 0,05%. Banks with excess reserves are now taxed twice more. The table here-below summarizes this scenario. According to the argument we initially referred to, banks would now like to lend more to each others given their reserves are more heavily taxed. Does it really make sense? The answer is no: the focus should be on relative figures instead of absolute figures.

 

Let's take two representative banks: bank E which has excess reserves, and bank Nwhich needs reserves for liquidity purpose. Say initially bank E didn't want to lend to bank N for a rate of +0,1%. The reason was that bank E judged that +0,1% was not a high enough remuneration given the risk involved and given the remuneration of its reserves (-0,1%): the +0,2% gain associated with a loan to bank N (0,1-(-0,1)) was not appealing enough given the risk involved. However, bank E was ready to lend to bank N for a rate of +0,2%, since the +0,3% associated gain was judged more adapted to the risk involved. At this rate though, bank N preferred to borrow from the ECB which offered a lower rate (+0,15% rate)... At the end no interbank loan took place.

Now with the decrease in the ECB interest rates the rates at which banks borrow and lend on the interbank market changed (monetary policy transmission). Bank E, which judged that a +0,3% gain was necessary for her to lend to bank N, is now ready to offer a loan at a +0,1% interest rate to bank N (deposit facility rate of -0,2% now + 0,3% = 0,1%). However, bank E still refuses to lend if the associated gain is 0,2%, thus if the interest rate on the loan is equal to 0%. As a consequence, the same situation as before will take place: bank N will go to borrow from the ECB at +0,05% now (after the rate decrease) since the rate offered is lower than the one required by bank E. Thus the fact that the interest rate on excess reserve became negative didn't change anything for the activity of the interbank market: bank R will still not lend to bank N [2]. To put it another way, the negativity of the interest rate on excess reserves has no impact on interbank lending activity. This conclusion is also suggested by the graph here below (recall the ECB went negative in mid-2014 and cut further the rates at the end of 2014).

 

Source: ECB, BSi Economics

 

2.      How a negative interest rate could still be associated with an increasing velocity of reserves: the corridor rate effect

An increasing velocity of reserves on the interbank market could still be observed after the implementation of a negative interest rate in two cases:

-       if the deposit facility rate cut is not associated with a cut in the refi rate (what the ECB did last December). In that case it is the enlargement of the ECB interest rates corridor which is responsible for the increasing velocity of reserves on the interbank market and thus not the negativity of the deposit facility rate.  In the framework discussed above, bank E was willing to lend to bank N only when the associated gain was greater or equal to +0,3%. Suppose only the deposit facility rate decreased from 10 basis points and the refi remained at +0,05%: bank E has the choice between borrowing from bank N at 0% or from the ECB at +0,05%: it will naturally choose the first option. As a result, interbank lending increase.

-       If part of excess reserves are taxed more than the rest of them (partial taxation of excess reserves). Examples of such systems are the ones put in place by the SNB or the BoJ recently. In that case, the effect is similar to the one described above with the enlargement of the corridor: bank E will find an interest in lending to bank N its more heavily taxed excess reserves at a rate below the refi rate, thus interbank lending will increase.

 

 

                        Conclusion

Hence, a negative interest rate on banks' excess reserves per secannot be expected to lead to an increasing velocity of reserves on the interbank market. However, an enlargement of the interest rates corridor of the central bank can produce this outcome. This effect could be obtained irrespective of the deposit facility rate.

Although the ECB decided to enlarge its interest rates corridor at last December meeting by lowering only its deposit facility rate (at -0,3%), it is not likely that this move was aimed at increasing interbank lending activity. After one year of QE, liquidity is not a problem anymore for the vast majority of banks in the Eurozone. Moreover, the Fixed-rate allotment procedure (FRFA)[3], which started after the crisis, still allows banks to borrow whichever amount of liquidity they need from the ECB. The intended effects of such a policy measure are more likely to be on the exchange rate.

 

Julien Pinter

  @JulienP_BSI

 

 

 

References:

Ducrozet, F. (2015): Q&A on the ECB's negative rates – Its decision to cut rates again should be FX-dependent. Perspectives Pictet (see Question 3)

Pinter, J. (2015): Le taux négatif de la BCE, quelques remarques pour dissiper les confusions. BSi Economics

Kaminska, I. (2012): The base money confusion . FT Alphaville

Standard&Poor's Ratingsdirect (2013): Repeat After Me: Banks Cannot And Do Not "Lend Out" Reserves

Stella, P. (2014): The Negative Rate Chrono Synclastic Infundibula. Stellar Consulting.

 

Notes:

[1] See Stella (2014) for a full discussion. Pinter (2015) and Ducrozet (2015) eg also provide further details.

[2] Supposing that there is an « incentive effect » implies supposing that banks are willing to take on more risks with the negativity of the interest rate on excess reserves.

[3] See this very educationnal post.

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

VERSION FRANCAISE

 

Le taux négatif de la BCE peut-il inciter les banques à se prêter plus entre elles ?

 

 

Le taux d'intérêt négatif de la BCE ne peut avoir pour but d'inciter les banques à prêter plus aux ménages ou aux entreprises via un « effet punitif » : la non-validité de cet argument a été discutée à de nombreuses reprises dans nos publications (BSi Economics 2015, Le Monde 2015) et par d'autres économistes (Ducrozet, 2015 ; Stella, 2014). La raison la plus simple pour le comprendre (parmi d'autres) est que les liquidités des banques ne sont pas transférées aux ménages ou entreprises lors d'une opération de crédit.

Mais qu'en est-il dans le cadre des prêts interbancaires, où les liquidités des banques sont effectivement transférées ? Le taux négatif pourrait-il créer une éventuelle incitation pour les banques à prêter davantage à leurs consœurs ? Si ce canal marchait, cela aurait pour effet d'augmenter la liquidité du marché interbancaire, ce qui serait bon in fine pour l'économie. Certains observateurs suggèrent cet argument.

Ce poste explique que cela ne peut être le cas : un taux négatif sur les liquidités excédentaires des banques n'a aucune raison d'avoir un effet incitatif particulier sur le crédit interbancaire (partie 1). Nous expliquons par contre qu'une plus grande circulation des liquidités sur le marché interbancaire peut avoir lieu à la suite de l'instauration d'un taux négatif dans deux cas particuliers (partie 2): (1) si seul le taux de rémunération des dépôts est abaissé (élargissement du corridor autours du taux directeur) (2) si seule une partie des liquidités excédentaires sont taxées (taxation partielle des réserves). Cela n'est pas due à la négativité du taux : la même mécanique serait à l'œuvre avec un taux positif. Malgré tout, il est très peu crédible que la BCE ait mis en place (1) (élargissement du corridor) en décembre dernier ou mette en place (2) (système de taxation partiel) en mars prochain avec comme but implicite la relance du marché interbancaire (conclusion).

 

 

1.       Un argument théorique invalide

Analysons l'argument mécanique en soit. Supposons que l'ensemble des réserves[1]excédentaires soient taxées à -0,1% (cas initial), et envisageons une baisse généralisée des taux directeurs de 0,1% de sorte à ce qu'on l'on passe à un taux négatif de -0,2% et à un taux refi (taux auquel les banques peuvent emprunter à la BCE) de +0,15% à +0,05% (mouvement observé en septembre 2014). Les banques qui ont des réserves excédentaires se trouvent donc davantage « taxées ». Selon l'argument précédent, elles voudraient donc se débarrasser davantage de leurs réserves lorsque le taux devient plus négatif puisque les réserves sont davantage taxées. Cela a-t-il un sens ? La réponse est non, car il faut s'intéresser au coût d'opportunité et non au « taux absolu ».

 

 

Prenons deux banques représentatives : la banque RE, ayant des réserves excédentaires, et la banque B, en besoin de liquidités. Si, auparavant, la banque RE ne voulaient pas prêter à la banque B, qui lui proposait un taux de +0,1% disons pour emprunter les liquidités, c'est parce qu'elle jugeait que la rémunération de +0,1% n'était pas assez juteuse compte tenu du risque et de la rémunération actuelle de ses liquidités (-0,1%) : le gain de +0,2% ( 0,1 – (-0,1) ) par rapport à la situation où elle garderait ses liquidités n'était pas assez attractif compte tenu du risque. Par contre, la banque RE, comme toutes les autres banques, souhaitait prêter à B à un taux de +0,2%, car cela lui garantissait un gain de +0,3% ( 0,1 – (-0,1) ) plus adapté au risque encouru. Mais à ce taux là la banque B préférait se tourner vers la banque centrale qui lui offrait un taux de refinancement de +0,15%[2]chaque semaine. Au final, il n'y avait pas de prêt interbancaire.

Maintenant, avec la baisse du taux de dépôts de la BCE de -0,1% à -0,2%, les conditions de crédit sur le marché interbancaire ont changé (transmission de la politique monétaire). Le banque RE qui jugeait qu'il fallait un gain de +0,3% compte tenu du risque de B pour lui prêter, est désormais prête à prêter pour un taux de +0,1% (-0,2% + 0,3%). Par contre, elle refuse toujours de prêter si le gain associé est de +0,2%, donc à un taux de 0% ici.  Au final, la banque B va faire la même chose qu'auparavant, à savoir emprunter auprès de la banque centrale au taux refi à +0,05% cette fois-ci. Il apparait donc clairement que le fait que le taux soit plus négatif ne change rien à l'activité sur le marché interbancaire. La banque RE n'a aucune incitation supplémentaire à prêter à la banque B après que le taux soit devenu plus négatif[3]. Autrement dit, la négativité du taux de dépôts n'a aucun effet sur l'activité interbancaire. Ce qui est aussi suggéré par les données sur l'activité du marché interbancaire en pratique sur le graph ci-dessous (rappel: le BCE a mis en place le taux négatif en juin 2014 et l'a baissé encore davantage en septembre 2014).

 

Source: ECB, BSi Economics

 

 

2.      Une plus grande circulation des liquidités possible malgré l'absence d'effet incitatif : un effet dû à l'élargissement du corridor

Cela peut peut-être sembler contre-intuitif au premier abord, mais une plus grande circulation des liquidités suite à l'instauration d'un taux de dépôt négatif n'est pas forcément un effet dû à la négativité de ce taux, ni le fruit d'une incitation accrue à prêter. En réalité, une plus grande circulation des liquidités peut avoir lieu dans deux cadres:

-          si la baisse du taux de dépôt n'est pas couplée à une baisse du refi (ce qu'a fait la BCE en décembre). Dans ce cadre, c'est l'élargissement du corridorqui est à l'origine de cette plus grande circulation des liquidités et non le taux négatif en soit. Pour faire simple, partons du cadre précédent où la banque RE n'acceptait de prêter à la banque B qu'à un taux supérieur de +0,3% du taux de dépôts de la BCE. Si, lorsque le taux de dépôts baisse à -0,2% le taux refi ne baisse pas et reste à 0,15%: la banque B peut désormais emprunter à +0,1% auprès de la banque RE ou à +0,15% auprès de la BCE ; elle choisira bien entendu la première option. En résultat, les liquidités circuleront donc plus.

-          Si une partie des liquidités excédentaires est taxée davantage que la majorité d'entre elles (système de taxation partiel). Un système mis en place en Suède, en Suisse ou au Japon par exemple. Dans ce cas là, l'effet est similaire à celui décrit ci-dessus avec l'élargissement du corridor : la banque RE trouvera un intérêt à prêter à un taux en dessous du taux refi ses réserves taxées davantage[4], la circulation des réserves augmentera.

 

             3.      Conclusion

Ainsi, la négativité du taux de dépôt n'implique pas en soit une plus grande circulation des liquidités sur le marché interbancaire. C'est l'élargissement du corridor au contraire qui peut en être à l'origine. Le même effet pourrait donc être obtenu avec un taux de dépôts positif.

La BCE a-t-elle alors baissé le taux négatif seul (élargissement du corridor) en décembre dernier dans le but de relancer les emprunts interbancaires? Il y a peu de chances que cela soit le cas. Les banques sont actuellement gonflées de liquidités, si bien qu'elles n'ont quasiment aucun problème de ce côté là. De plus, la procédure de FRFA (Fixed Rate Full Allotement[5]) qui dure depuis le début de la crise a été prolongée pour un certain temps encore, ce qui veut dire que les banques peuvent obtenir toutes les liquidités qu'elles souhaitent auprès de la BCE. L'effet de la mesure du taux négatif est plutôt à aller chercher ailleurs dans le cas de la BCE, vers le taux de change notamment.

 

 

Julien Pinter

  @JulienP_BSI

 

 

 

References:

Ducrozet, F. (2015): Q&A on the ECB's negative rates – Its decision to cut rates again should be FX-dependent. Perspectives Pictet (see Question 3)

Pinter, J. (2015): Le taux négatif de la BCE, quelques remarques pour dissiper les confusions. BSi Economics

Pinter, J. (2014): Le taux négatif n'incitera pas davantage au crédit. Le Monde

Kaminska, I. (2012): The base money confusion . FT Alphaville

Standard&Poor's Ratingsdirect (2013): Repeat After Me: Banks Cannot And Do Not "Lend Out" Reserves

Stella, P. (2014): The Negative Rate Chrono Synclastic Infundibula. Stellar Consulting.

 

 

Notes:

[1] Dans cet article « réserves » et « liquidités » font référence au même concept.

[2] Le taux cohérent avec les chiffres précédents aurait été +0,05% bien sûr (taux refi actuel) mais ce chiffre se prête mieux à l'explication.

[3] Supposer qu'il y a un effet incitatif revient en fait à supposer l'existence d'une plus grande prise de risque par les banques, qui accepteraient maintenant de prêter à des marges faibles malgré le risque. C'est le canal de la prise de risques dont il serait question ici plutôt qu'un effet particulier du taux négatif.

[4] Il est possible également dans ce cas que le mécanisme d'arbitrage décrit en note de bas de page 2 soit moins efficient (nombre insuffisant de « market players »), ce qui implique également une plus grande circulation des liquidités.

[5] Régime d'appels d'offres illimités de liquidité à taux fixe, voir ce lientrès explicatif  sur la mesure .

 

 

Avatar

Julien Pinter est chercheur (PhD) en Economie monétaire et bancaire à l'Université Paris 1 Panthéon-Sorbonne. Il travaille notamment sur les questions relatives aux risques aux bilans des banques centrales et sur la soutenabilité des pegs. Il a des expériences de travail à la Banque Centrale Européenne et à la Banque de France en particulier. Il a été visiting researcher à l'Université d'Amsterdam, a travaillé à l'Université de Bruxelles Saint-Louis et étudié à l'Université de Stockholm. Julien Pinter est diplômé du Master Monnaie Banque et Finance de l'Université Paris 1 Panthéon-Sorbonne (major de la promotion 2012) et du Magistère d'Economie de Paris 1.